BBC

Liam Neeson says he's 'not racist' after rape comments in interview
Liam Neeson has denied he is racist, after admitting he once set out to kill any black man who provoked him. The actor has been facing a major racism storm since he made the comments in an interview, published by The Independent on Monday. He said he walked the streets with a weapon around 40 years ago, hoping to take out his anger after someone close to him was raped by a black man. But speaking on ABC's Good Morning America, Neeson said: "I'm not racist." The Hollywood star told ABC's Robin Roberts on Tuesday that around 40 years ago, one of his close female friends told him she had been raped. That friend, Neeson added, passed away five years ago. Neeson said his friend's alleged rape made him want to take violent action. He said: "I had never felt this feeling before which was a primal urge to lash out, and I asked her, 'did you know the person, was it a man?' No. 'Race?' She said it was a black man." The actor said he "went out deliberately into black areas in the city looking to be set upon so that I could unleash physical violence". He added: "I did it maybe four or five times." The Taken star claimed he would have acted in the same way if his friend's assailant had been white. He told ABC: "If she had said an Irish or a Scot or a Brit or a Lithuanian I would - I know I would - have had the same effect. I was trying to show honour, to stand up for my dear friend in this terribly medieval fashion." Neeson said of his actions: "It shocked me and it hurt me. I did seek help."
Karim Hossam: The rise and fall of a match-fixing tennis prodigy
Karim Hossam was one of the best young tennis players in the world. He looked set to play at the biggest tournaments, with the top players of the game. Instead he was sucked into one of the biggest match-fixing rings yet discovered in a sport riddled with corruption. The BBC's Simon Cox and Paul Grant use confidential documents to tell the story of his downfall. It was inside a modest hotel room in Tunisia in June 2017 that Karim Hossam's tennis career started to unravel. Across from the 24-year-old sat two former British police detectives. They were investigators for the Tennis Integrity Unit, which probes corruption within the game, and they suspected Karim had been fixing matches. In a series of interviews over six months he revealed how four years earlier he had become a part of one of the biggest match-fixing rings in tennis. The International Tennis Federation Futures tournament at Sharm el-Sheikh is a distant cousin to the glamour, money and crowds of Wimbledon or the French Open. Played at a small tennis club next to a shopping mall, there is a smattering of spectators and the prize money for the whole tournament is $15,000 (£11,500) - about a quarter of the sum made by a first-round loser at Wimbledon. Karim Hossam had already won the tournament four times when he arrived to compete there again in 2013. Still only 20, the young Egyptian player was the great hope for North African tennis.
Paris fire: Ten dead and many injured at apartment block
Ten people including a baby have died in a fire at an eight-storey building in south-western Paris, fire service officials say. More than 30 people - including six firefighters - were injured. One person is in a serious condition. Fifty people were evacuated by ladders from the blaze in the upmarket 16th arrondissement. The Paris prosecutor says it may have been deliberately started. Police have detained a female suspect. French President Emmanuel Macron said that the country "had woken up to tragedy", and praised the fire services for their courage. Rue Erlanger is a residential street close to the Parc des Princes soccer stadium.
Sources
--:-- / --:--
Playing Now
    ×
    --:-- / --:--
    ×